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11/19/2016 2:18 am  #1


Possible halt to the killing

According to my mom the local news says the local police department and the fbi worked together to irridicate a bunch of crazy illegals from el salvador that came in to take over on the gang activity. They are saying they are responsible for 13 or 14 killings.

So if that's true they say the murder rate will be dropping to just a few a year. And those working at the emergency room wont be having to sow up peoples guts from the stab wounds.

The police dept there has alwayz been top notch. No politics and no bs. They even had the balls to say when an elderly lady whom was also a vet was beaten to death with a hammer in her home while she was asleep at night from an illegal whom had no business here. The dept said, "you could see a blood trail from washington to her door step."

I do hope they got rid of the main problem. It does concern me with my nieces growing up there. My mom there whom is handicapped and cant walk. Its one thing when your an adult and can protect yourself. Its different when you cant. So i do think about it off and on and always have. But i dont let it get to me either.

Last edited by running (11/19/2016 2:21 am)

 

11/19/2016 9:35 am  #2


Re: Possible halt to the killing

One must be careful of fear mongering when it comes to Illegal Immigrants and other minority groups. Crime examples can be found in all groups of people, and the those who commit the crimes do not represent the rest of their people. Exaggerating and making more implications can only lead to more fear and anger, that can only lead to more fear and anger, and that will only give birth to racism and hate. The real undertone to all this is bullying and control.

Running, do not let fear mongering influence you. If you do, you are letting yourself open to control by people who are not to nice, and want to bully and to have control over others. They are not interested in reducing crime, or the safety of you, or your relations.

Last edited by Thunderbow (11/19/2016 9:37 am)

 

11/19/2016 12:52 pm  #3


Re: Possible halt to the killing

Thunderbow wrote:

One must be careful of fear mongering when it comes to Illegal Immigrants and other minority groups. Crime examples can be found in all groups of people, and the those who commit the crimes do not represent the rest of their people. Exaggerating and making more implications can only lead to more fear and anger, that can only lead to more fear and anger, and that will only give birth to racism and hate. The real undertone to all this is bullying and control.

Running, do not let fear mongering influence you. If you do, you are letting yourself open to control by people who are not to nice, and want to bully and to have control over others. They are not interested in reducing crime, or the safety of you, or your relations.

 

I grew up there. It is a hispanic community. Its mostly hispanics that are getting killed in these circumstances. This isnt some kimda ethnicity sstatement.  This is about my home town where i grew up.

My two best friends are hispanic. Had a girlfriend for years that was hispanic. It is simply about what happend. Which is illegals from el salvador coming in taking over the gangs.  People getting killed.

I hope that makes sense.

Last edited by running (11/19/2016 3:05 pm)

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11/19/2016 1:16 pm  #4


Re: Possible halt to the killing

SANTA MARIA, Calif. - Last year was the most violent in memory for Santa Maria. There were 13 killings in a city that averages three or four murders a year. In January of this year, there were six homicides, five of them attributed to street violence.

In March, police arrested 17 alleged MS-13 gang members, and have brought murder charges on 10 of those killings. Since then, the murder rate has gone back to the norm for the city of just over 100,000 people.

As the court case appears headed for what could be the largest trial in Santa Barbara County history, Police Chief Ralph Martin sat down with KCOY 12 for an extensive interview on how they put a stop to a crime wave like no other.

Scroll to the bottom to watch Scott Hennessee's special report.

"They're ruthless," Martin said. "They are absolutely ruthless and they are a killing machine."


Police Chief Ralph Martin doesn't mince words when describing the MS-13 street gang.

"They just started their wave of terror. It's the only way you can really describe it," he said.

The chief reviews a chart showing 10 homicides in Santa Maria from December of 2014 to December of 2015. Nine of the killings on the chart have been attributed by police to MS-13. In January of 2016, there were five street killings in the city, which is more than Santa Maria averages in a year.

"We saw an unprecedented amount of shootings starting in June of '15 and culminating all the way up to January or February of this year," Martin said.

Over a period of months Santa Maria Police conducted surveillance on multiple people they believe to be members of MS-13. Martin says 15 detectives worked full-time, intercepting phone calls and text messages, and monitoring social media activity.

With the help of neighboring law enforcement, the FBI and the ATF, Santa Maria Police conducted Operation Matador. In the early morning hours of March 3rd, 16 arrests were made in multiple locations over the course of three hours without incident. Another suspect was arrested the next day. The operation involved 150 officers, with some of the arrests being made outside of the area.

"I think it was an operation like no other that's ever been undertaken on the Central Coast," Martin said.


In nearly nine months since Operation Matador, there have been three killings in Santa Maria, none of them connected to MS-13.

"I feel the Santa Maria Police Department did a great job in cleaning up the MS-13 gang violence," local resident Georgianna Hernandez said. "I feel much safer now."

While the murder rate has stabilized since Operation Matador, others still fell unsafe at times in Santa Maria.

"I won't go certain places at night," Orcutt resident, Jeanne Lethbridge said. "(I'm) always nervous when I come out of the movies, and park real close to the theater."

Chief Martin sees Operation Matador as a turning point against crime in the city. Seventeen defendants with street names like Smiley, Psycho, and Bandit now face charges brought by a Grand Jury.

"The defendants appeared in court on those charging documents," Assistant District Attorney Ann Bramsen said. "Their attorney's asked to continue their arraignment to December 2nd."

The Grand Jury heard enough evidence to bring forth 10 murder charges and 14 attempted murder, or conspiracy to commit murder charges against the alleged members of MS-13. Those court documents are sealed, but we did obtain other court documents that outline a series of targeted killings.

"It's our opinion," Police Chief Martin said, "That they were stalking their prey, and we were following them."


A declaration filed at a bail reduction hearing by District Attorney Joyce Dudley describes the "sophisticated techniques" the suspects used to track, identify and scout their victims. It also asserts the only reason six attempted murder victims are alive is because police had the suspects on a wire tap and stepped in.

"Most of their victims we could see were targeted," Martin said. "They were targeted gang members. A lot of people say well they were just killing other gang members. But you know what, no. We had to intervene."

Martin says some of the victims were associated with the 18th Street Gang, the sworn enemy of MS-13. Both originated in Los Angeles from Salvadorian Civil War exiles in the 1980's.

Many were sent home to El Salvador after the war and gang culture went with them. El Salvador know has the highest murder rate in the world.

Chief Martin says MS-13 has 40,000 members and is in 40 states across the country.

"I'm hoping that the FBI will one day label them as a terrorist organization," Martin said.

It's Ann Bramsen's job to prosecute them in what could be the biggest trial in Santa Barbara County history.


There could be 17 or more lawyers in the courtroom. Each defendant can also have a translator and investigator, making for a potentially difficult logistical situation. A venue for a potential trial has not yet been chosen.

Bramsen successfully prosecuted 5 of 6 gang members in the so called U-Haul murder trial, a case involving unpaid drug debts. That was one murder. This is at least 10, and Chief Martin emphasizes, these suspects are not products of Santa Maria.

"I try to tell people the city gets a bad rap you know with this tremendous crime rate going on," Martin says. "But the reality is, this group just moved in. It'd be like the Mafia in Chicago just moving in to your city and all of a sudden taxing people and really committing horrendous acts."

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11/19/2016 1:43 pm  #5


Re: Possible halt to the killing

Santa Maria slaying suspect was in U.S. illegally, had numerous brushes with the law
David Zahniser and Matt HamiltonContact Reporters
A man who was in the U.S. illegally and charged with raping, torturing and killing a Santa Barbara County woman last month had been arrested repeatedly in recent years — and was released from jail just days before the fatal attack, authorities said.

Police say Victor Aureliano Martinez Ramirez, 29, and another man broke into the home of 64-year-old Marilyn Pharis in Santa Maria on July 24 and attacked her with a hammer and sexually assaulted her. Pharis, a veteran of the U.S. Air Force who worked at Vandenberg Air Force Base, died Aug. 1 from her wounds.


Ramirez, who also goes by the name Victor Martinez, was booked into Santa Barbara County Jail on drug and weapons charges July 17, according to the Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Office. He was ordered released July 20 after pleading no contest to the weapons charge.

Pharis' death came weeks after the arrest of a Mexican immigrant in connection with the fatal shooting of a 32-year-old woman at San Francisco's Embarcadero. The man charged in that homicide, Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez, is a seven-time felon who was in the country illegally and had been deported five times.


In the Ramirez case, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement asked Santa Barbara custody officials to put a detention hold on him last year after he was charged with felony assault with intent to commit sexual assault. The detainer was meant to ensure Ramirez would be transferred into federal custody before his release.


Victor Aureliano Martinez Ramirez has been charged in the rape and fatal assault of a 64-year-old woman. (Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Office)
But his case was downgraded to a misdemeanor. Santa Barbara custody officials concluded that keeping Ramirez would violate the state's Trust Act, which allows local law enforcement to hold inmates for immigration authorities only if they have been charged with a serious crime.

The county, like hundreds of other jurisdictions across the country, had also determined that it could no longer honor immigration agency requests to hold inmates beyond their jail terms without a federal warrant or court order because of a court ruling in a 2014 Oregon case.

The effect of both the ruling and state law has created a "significant legal and moral conflict" for sheriffs who are responsible for custody decisions, Santa Barbara sheriff's officials said in a statement. "It is imperative that the federal government work to remedy this conflict and provide clear guidance to California sheriffs."

See the most-read stories this hour >>
On Sunday, federal officials said they declined to issue an immigration detainer on Ramirez last month because his case history failed to turn up any deportations or felony criminal convictions. They also asserted that the immigration agency does not need to produce a warrant to be notified of a pending release.

Immigration agency spokeswoman Virginia Kice said her agency has lodged a formal request with local law enforcement seeking notification before Ramirez's release or transfer from local custody. "Given the seriousness of the allegations associated with this individual's arrest, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is monitoring the case closely," she said in a statement.

On Friday, Santa Maria police Chief Ralph Martin denounced state and federal detention policies for immigrants in the U.S. illegally, saying at a news conference that "there's a blood trail leading to the bedroom of Marilyn Pharis" from Sacramento and Washington.

"You know what we had to do? We had to cite [Ramirez] out," said the chief, according to a report from Santa Barbara's KEYT-TV Channel 3. "That's the problem with this system. This is not just in Santa Maria. This is all over the state of California and all over the United States."

Ramirez and a second man, 20-year-old Jose Fernando Villagomez, face a number of charges in the Santa Maria case, including first-degree murder and carrying out "rape by instrument." Villagomez is a U.S. citizen.

According to the sheriff's timeline, Ramirez, who was identified as a transient, was first apprehended in 2009 on suspicion of driving without a valid license. He was booked into the Santa Barbara jail system and released a few weeks later.

Authorities were unable to say Sunday whether he had been convicted of that violation. At the time, custody officials did not receive any detention requests from federal immigration officials, sheriff's officials said.

In May 2014, Ramirez was the subject of more serious charges: felony assault with the intent to commit sexual assault, and felony possession of a controlled substance. In that instance, immigration officials filed a detainer asking the sheriff to provide notice before Ramirez's release so that he could be taken into U.S. custody, federal officials said.

Days later, Ramirez's felony assault charge was replaced by a misdemeanor count of battery. Soon after, sheriff's officials concluded they could not hold Ramirez without a federal warrant or court order from immigration authorities, a decision based on the Oregon ruling.

In the Oregon case, a federal court concluded that law enforcement officials in Clackamas County had violated a woman's 4th Amendment rights by holding her for immigration authorities beyond her release date.

A sheriff's spokeswoman said she could not confirm whether Ramirez had been convicted on the 2014 battery charge.

On July 17, Ramirez was booked on two more charges: a felony count of possessing a concealed dagger or similar weapon and a misdemeanor charge of possessing drug paraphernalia. But the drug charge was dismissed days later, and the felony charge was downgraded to a misdemeanor, according to the sheriff's office.

Ramirez pleaded no contest to the misdemeanor weapons charge and was sentenced to 30 days in jail — but not until the end of October. He was ordered released July 20.

Santa Barbara County Dist. Atty. Joyce Dudley said she too is frustrated with state and federal policies on suspects who are in the country illegally. She called the case heartbreaking and said "more clarity" is needed between state and federal laws.

"I personally attended the autopsy," she said. "The victim served our country for nearly 40 years. She bravely fought back."

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11/19/2016 2:44 pm  #6


Re: Possible halt to the killing

Fifteen people linked to the violent MS-13 international criminal gang were arrested Thursday, and dozens of others were detained after a monthslong investigation into multiple murders and other shootings in Santa Maria.

“Operation Matador” involved serving search and arrest warrants before dawn at multiple locations in Santa Maria, elsewhere in California and out of state, police Chief Ralph Martin said during an afternoon news conference at the Santa Maria Police Department station.

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In all, 15 people were arrested and 40 others detained in the efforts that involved multiple law enforcement agencies and close to 150 officers.

“All of those arrested are from El Salvador or Honduras, all are members of MS-13 — Mara Salvatrucha — a notoriously brutal, organized transnational gang,” Martin said.

MS-13 reportedly has 50,000 members in 40 states, the chief said.


“The city of Santa Maria, and I know I speak for other cities here, will no longer be a city where MS-13 or any other street gang can live or engage in a career criminal enterprise,” Martin added. “We know who they are, we know where they are, what vehicles they drive, who they associate with. We know what they had for lunch yesterday.

“This is only the beginning of our attempt to continue our efforts to completely, unequivocally eradicate this organized group from existing in Santa Maria,” he said.

Read more here: http://www.sanluisobispo.com/news/local/crime/article64036857.html#storylink=cpy

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11/19/2016 2:58 pm  #7


Re: Possible halt to the killing

Santa Maria cracks down on violent gang, arrests 15

40 others detained in multiagency investigation into rash of murders and shootings

Arrested suspects are all from El Salvador or Honduras and linked to the MS-13 gang

Santa Maria police chief says the gang arrived within the past two years and aimed to “own the town”
Some of the 15 people arrested in Operation Matador, led by the Santa Maria Police Department. San Luis Obispo County Sheriff Ian Parkinson speaks Thursday at a Santa Maria Police Department news conference for “Operation Matador.” The Sheriff’s Office was one of several agencies involved in the crackdown. A board shows Santa Maria gang suspects arrested in “Operation Matador.” Santa Maria Police Chief Ralph Martin speaks Thursday at a press conference about “Operation Matador,” conducted in the wake of multiple homicides in the city. Some of the 15 people arrested in Operation Matador, led by the Santa Maria Police Department. San Luis Obispo County Sheriff Ian Parkinson speaks Thursday at a Santa Maria Police Department news conference for “Operation Matador.” The Sheriff’s Office was one of several agencies involved in the crackdown.
1 of 4 i
BY JANENE SCULLY
Noozhawk.com



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Fifteen people linked to the violent MS-13 international criminal gang were arrested Thursday, and dozens of others were detained after a monthslong investigation into multiple murders and other shootings in Santa Maria.

“Operation Matador” involved serving search and arrest warrants before dawn at multiple locations in Santa Maria, elsewhere in California and out of state, police Chief Ralph Martin said during an afternoon news conference at the Santa Maria Police Department station.

In all, 15 people were arrested and 40 others detained in the efforts that involved multiple law enforcement agencies and close to 150 officers.

“All of those arrested are from El Salvador or Honduras, all are members of MS-13 — Mara Salvatrucha — a notoriously brutal, organized transnational gang,” Martin said.

MS-13 reportedly has 50,000 members in 40 states, the chief said.


“The city of Santa Maria, and I know I speak for other cities here, will no longer be a city where MS-13 or any other street gang can live or engage in a career criminal enterprise,” Martin added. “We know who they are, we know where they are, what vehicles they drive, who they associate with. We know what they had for lunch yesterday.

“This is only the beginning of our attempt to continue our efforts to completely, unequivocally eradicate this organized group from existing in Santa Maria,” he said.

WE KNOW WHO THEY ARE, WE KNOW WHERE THEY ARE, WHAT VEHICLES THEY DRIVE, WHO THEY ASSOCIATE WITH. WE KNOW WHAT THEY HAD FOR LUNCH YESTERDAY.
Santa Maria police Chief Ralph Martin on the MS-13 gang


A spike in homicides, with a significant increase within the past six months, led local detectives to enlist a task force approach to solve the crimes while using thorough forensic analysis instead of reviewing each individually.

“This turned out to be very fruitful,” Martin said, adding that investigators sought help from federal agents and others in Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo and Ventura counties.

Detectives identified several suspects believed to be involved in the crimes, securing arrest and search warrants served at 12 locations at 3 a.m. Thursday.

Those warrants were simultaneously served at eight locations in Santa Maria, two in the Bakersfield area, one in Oxnard and one in Columbus, Ohio.


In addition to solving some crimes, the chief believes the investigators prevented other killings.

“I need to mention that during this investigation, at least six additional homicides were prevented in the past four weeks,” the chief said. “This was due to the incredible work by the investigative team and their swift actions to protect the targeted victims before the hit was done.”

MS-13 in Santa Maria

MS-13 apparently moved into the Santa Maria area within the past two years “to make a statement” as they attempted to “own the town,” the chief added.

“They’re very organized. They’re obviously in the drug trade and other things. They came to Santa Maria to set up shop,” Martin added.

Those arrested include some people considered leaders in the MS-13 gang, he added.

“This case stretched all the way back to Columbus, Ohio. That’s the reach these people have,” he said.

Martin did not identify which local homicides the suspects are connected to, saying it’s too premature. However, he did say that almost all of the people targeted were other gang members.

“The public should know that what you see up here is a collaborative effort that we’re not going to give up — whether it’s Oscar Joaquin or Brayan Molina-Mejia or any of our victims — that we’re not going to rest,” Martin added.

Several of the killings in recent months have similar hallmarks that made them appear to be linked to MS-13, instead of one of the local gangs tied to the Sureños.

“The two known street gangs in Santa Maria are actually attributed to one or two of the homicides, but the vast majority of the homicides we’ve had, we believe, are being committed by MS-13,” Martin said.

Santa Barbara County Sheriff Bill Brown noted the detailed investigation conducted over many months required before Thursday’s arrests.

Despite the massive effort — with arrests at multiple locations while securing evidence and detaining up to 40 others — the operation occurred without any incidents or use of force, Brown said, calling it “a remarkable feat.”

“This incident exemplifies the precision and professionalism that occurs out there 98 percent of the time,” Brown said. “The skill with which this operation was conducted is extraordinary.”

WE’RE PROUD TO SEND THE MESSAGE THAT THE BORDERS DON’T STOP AT THE SANTA MARIA BRIDGE. THEY CONTINUE TO SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, AND WE WILL CONTINUE TO FIGHT THIS BATTLE AND WORK TOGETHER AS PARTNERS IN MAKING SURE THAT ANY EFFORTS TO RESTART AND CONTINUE WITH THIS ACTIVITY IS GOING TO GO WITH A VERY WATCHFUL EYE.
San Luis Obispo County Sheriff Ian Parkinson

Brown also had a message for criminal street gang members who go to Santa Barbara County to commit the type of heinous crimes that started the investigation.

“Look behind me. Notice that we don’t stand alone in this county when it comes to investigating, identifying, hunting down, arresting and bringing before the bar of justice those who would commit these types of evil deeds in any jurisdiction within Santa Barbara County,” Brown said. “So let that be a warning to anybody who’s thinking or contemplating anything like this in the future.”

San Luis Obispo County Sheriff Ian Parkinson noted his jurisdiction’s proximity to Santa Maria.

“We’re proud to send the message that the borders don’t stop at the Santa Maria bridge. They continue to San Luis Obispo County, and we will continue to fight this battle and work together as partners in making sure that any efforts to restart and continue with this activity is going to go with a very watchful eye.”

Joint operation

Operation Matador included members of the Santa Maria, Lompoc and Oxnard police departments, deputies from the Santa Barbara County and San Luis Obispo County sheriff’s offices, the Santa Barbara County District Attorney’s Office, the FBI, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and more.

Assistance in linking the crimes with suspects came from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, which conducted critical forensics tests.

As homicides occurred, Santa Maria police came under criticism from residents, while the City Council expressed support for the police chief and department.

“I especially want to thank our mayor and our City Council, who knew we were diligently working behind the scenes to solve these horrific crimes that blemished our community,” Martin said.

The chief noted the thousands of hours put in by detectives to assemble the evidence.

“They’re the real heroes …,” he said. “Literally, they are the ones who put this together, and I’m proud of them.”

Mayor Alice Patino said she had confidence in the Police Department that arrests would occur.

“What I’d like the public to know is this operation is like no other operation in the city of Santa Maria’s history,” Patino said. “The success of this morning’s operation lies in the leadership of this department as well as the coordinated efforts of our partner agencies.”

“I thank and I commend all of you on helping the city of Santa Maria by making our streets safe again,” Patino said.

She also called on the residents of Santa Maria to work to keep the city safe by reporting crimes.

“You have a responsibility, and I want you to do your part,” she said. “When you see crimes being committed, you have to report it. And please go up to a police officer every time you see them and say thank you. They deserve our thanks.”

Many of the suspects were expected to be arraigned in Santa Barbara County Superior Court in Santa Maria on Friday, authorities said.

Charges they face include as many as six counts apiece of conspiracy to commit murder with special allegation of criminal street gang involvement.

Other charges include active participation in a criminal street gang, conspiracy to be an active participant in a criminal street gang, carrying a concealed firearm and carrying a loaded firearm in public.

“This investigation is ongoing, and there may be more suspects arrested in the future,” Martin said.

15 arrested

Those arrested in Santa Maria were Jose Balmore Lainez Saravia, 31, aka “Pacho”; Jose Ricardo Saravia Lainez, 24, aka “Alex”; Marcos Manuel Sanchez Torres, 21, aka “Silent”; Tranquilino Robles Morales, 28, aka “Bandit”; Juan Carlos Lozano Membreno, 27, aka “Psycho”; Jose Narciso Escobar Hernandez, 25, aka “El Cuervo”; Luis Mejia Orellana, 22, aka “Smiley”; Juan Carlos Serrano, 30, aka “Catra”; Enedina Tomas, 33, aka “Mimi”; and Mayra Ortega, 24, aka “Linzii.”

Arrested in Bakersfield was Rafael Castro Lainez, 30, while Jose Mejia Orellano, 23, aka “Extrano,” was arrested in Oxnard.

Jose Bonilla-Mejia, 27 or 29, aka “Emedalio” or “Lalo,” was taken into custody in Ohio.

The name of the 15th suspect wasn’t immediately available.

To complicate matters, some of the suspects have multiple names, requiring additional investigation to confirm identities, the chief said.

Of the 40 people taken into custody, many were handed over to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement, while others were released.

Noozhawk North County editor Janene Scully can be reached at jscully@noozhawk.com. Follow Noozhawk on Twitter: @noozhawk, @NoozhawkNews and @NoozhawkBiz. Connect with Noozhawk on Facebook.

Read more here: http://www.sanluisobispo.com/news/local/crime/article64036857.html#storylink=cpy

     Thread Starter
 

11/19/2016 3:03 pm  #8


Re: Possible halt to the killing

Again this is my home town im talking about where my nieces are and my mom whom is handicapped.

This is a serious situation we have been dealing with. I have been sympathetic about a pipeline going on in Native land on this forum. I hope it can be understood im talking about what has been going on in my home town.

     Thread Starter
 

11/19/2016 3:25 pm  #9


Re: Possible halt to the killing

I can see it from both sides there is good and bad in every nation,but dec 16 th i will be in court along with my neighbour.why because her daughters partner is an illegal immigrant from nigeria.he is a horrid person he is vile he speaks down to everyone as though they are beneath him.he has stopped my neighbour going to her daughters house and has said she is not allowed to see her grandkids,
 she pulled up outside her daughters house to give her some money to buy something for her eldest grandchilds lunch box for school he is not the illegals son, he started shouting at her grabbed a bottle smashed it against the wall and ran at her telling her he was going to kill her.
 she came home in tears texted my daughter for her to go see her,she was to distraught so i went i told her to phone the police and report him.he was arrested he resisted arrest ,
 her daughter needed the council to go see to a wall that was falling down the workers went there he gave them a mouth full of abuse.all he does all day is smoke pot.he has been regected twice to stay in the country once more he gets deported back to nigeria.he is one vile individual.
 yet on the other hand i had a delivery today the men delivering the parcels were well spoken couldnt do enough for you one was polish the other indian.so i can see it from both directions.
 i live in wales we hate the english it a deep hatred from generations ago they drowned one of our villages to supply england with water.they tried to buy all the properties in wales.thats how Meibion Glyndwr came about .the ira came about because of religion and the english they hate them too.
 as we go through each generation something else starts up .hate is  a hurtfull word but one that is used a lot. but it was said that Love and Hate are not so far apart.

Last edited by Native spirit (11/19/2016 3:29 pm)


The spoken word always comes back as whispers in the wind.
 

11/19/2016 6:56 pm  #10


Re: Possible halt to the killing

On the Navajo Reservation there are gangs, murder, and crime. Also there are drugs and more gang activity done elsewhere, all committed my Navajo people.In other towns in AZ, Some Navajo people are gang members doing the same exact thing as what you just posted here, When I was working at the Grand Canyon, a Navajo man stabbed to death a Hopi lady, and shoved the body under the bed. That happened just a few doors down from me. The murder rate is high on the reservation.

Going by the reasoning posted above, all Navajos should be returned to the reservation, because they have gangs throughout AZ. They also commit many murders, thus they make AZ very unsafe. Obama refused to restrict Navajos to the reservation, so he is to blame for all this crime in AZ.

I am sure you think the last sentance I just posted above to be irrational. But then so is the above argument. Murders are committed by individuals. Gangs are a group of individuals.The actions of these individuals do not represent the whole Navajo Nation, no more than the acts of those illegals represent all illegals entering this country.

Gangs are acomplex social problem that is associated with drugs and other activies. The is no simple solution. They even have taken over the Grand Canyon! You police done their job, so has Obama. Please do not blame a whole group of people for the actions of some gang indivuals. Do not buy into the fear mongering.

 

Last edited by Thunderbow (11/19/2016 7:13 pm)

 

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